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Book The Hard Way Home: From Corregidor to Manchuria, Three Years a Prisoner of the Japanese in World War II

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The Hard Way Home: From Corregidor to Manchuria, Three Years a Prisoner of the Japanese in World War II

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    Available in PDF - DJVU Format | The Hard Way Home: From Corregidor to Manchuria, Three Years a Prisoner of the Japanese in World War II.pdf | Language: ENGLISH
    William C Braly(Author) Steve W Chadde(Preface)

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The Hard Way Home is the story of the 3-1/2 year imprisonment of U.S. Army Colonel William Braly by the Japanese in World War II. From the surrender of Allied forces on Corregidor in May 1942, to prison camps in the Philippines, Taiwan, Japan, and Manchuria, and transport by notorious 'death-ships,' Braley struggles to survive the brutality, hard labor, and lack of food and medical care before his release in August 1945. His firsthand account is filled with details of the often grim reality faced by Allied servicemen held as prisoners-of-war. Illustrated with 12 pages of maps and photographs.
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  • By Penmark on 29 July 2015

    I had just read 'Unbroken' and I'd also read the novel 'the Narrow road to the deep north' by Richard Flanagan. So I was in Japanese mode. This book was written a couple of years after VJ Day, so is contemporary. The author was a colonel in the US army, based in the Phillippines, prior to Pearl Harbour. There is a very good account of the defence of Corregidor and Bataan. My grandfather's second cousin Brigadier General Maxon S Lough was also in the Phillippines as a regular army man. In fact I read the book as I had seen a reference to his name. Unfortunately he was only listed in the back as a POW. Nevertheless the book was extremely interesting, from an officer perspective. It gave an insight into the Japanese psyche and culture. The deprivations were bad, particularly the lack of decent food, but not quite as harrowing as the fate of the Burma railway men. I have been to Corregidor and into the Malinta tunnel .... If only I had known my family connection back then! The author was held in Japan, Formosa, and finally in Mukden, Manchuria. They were liberated by the Russians! Who knew? A well written, clear and balanced book about the Pacifuc theatre of WW2.


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